Federal government confirms new Champlain Bridge wont be ready until 2019

first_imgMONTREAL – The new Champlain Bridge slated to open later this year now won’t welcome traffic until sometime in 2019, the federal government confirmed Thursday.Infrastructure Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne said during a visit to the site that key work won’t be completed before the winter months take over, forcing a delay to the planned Dec. 21 opening.The $4.2 billion bridge will now open sometime in 2019 — by next June at the latest — Champagne said.“To ensure the durability of the new bridge, certain finishing works … need to be done next spring,” he said.Champagne said while the main structure of the bridge will be completed by December, other work including waterproofing and paving of the span will have to wait until weather conditions are more favourable.Putting down a membrane and two layers of asphalt will take about two months and requires temperatures of at least 2 degrees Celsius.A firm opening date will be announced early next year, but in the meantime the old bridge located next to the new structure will remain open to traffic.Champagne said the government had undertaken measures in 2017 to ensure the old structure would remain “open, functional and safe.”Another $10 million has been added to the previous $50 million earmarked for keeping the aging bridge in service until the new span opens.Champagne said there will be a cost to the consortium building the new bridge because of the delivery delay.The contract provides penalties of $100,000 per day the bridge is late for the first seven days and $400,000 per day late after the first week, to a maximum of $150 million.“When there’s delays, there are consequences and both sides will be looking at the contractual terms and conditions, there will be discussion and there will be legal and financial consequences,” Champagne said. “However, I must say the focus of everyone is to deliver the new Champlain Bridge.”Some 1,600 workers have worked around the clock, seven days a week on the Champlain Bridge project.Champagne said the project has been hit by certain “excusable delays” and any penalties will be the subject of confidential discussions among lawyers.Daniel Genest, who heads Signature on the Saint Lawrence Group — the consortium building the bridge — said a crane was struck by lightning, immobilizing it for three days. Crane operators were also on strike in June and there were some weather-related delays.Genest believed a Dec. 21 delivery was possible until September, because of those delays.“I did ask for other expert opinions which confirmed the work could not be done,” Champagne said. “In my role managing public money, we had to come to the conclusion that this work could not be done without impacting the durability.”The new bridge is expected to last 125 years.last_img read more

Trade tribunal tosses US firms complaint about warshipdesign competition

first_imgOTTAWA — A federal trade tribunal is tossing out a challenge to the federal government’s handling of a high-stakes competition to design the navy’s new $60-billion fleet of warships.The Canadian International Trade Tribunal’s ruling removes one potential obstacle as Ottawa prepares to award a design contract for the warships to U.S.-based defence giant Lockheed Martin.The government and Irving Shipbuilding selected Lockheed’s proposed warship design in October over submissions from Alion Science and Technology of Virginia and Spanish firm Navantia.Alion subsequently filed complaints with the trade tribunal as well as the Federal Court, saying Lockheed’s design did not meet the navy’s requirements and should have been disqualified.But in a ruling issued on Thursday, the trade tribunal said neither Alion nor its Canadian subsidiary met the requirements to file a challenge and that it was dismissing the complaint.The government and Irving have been negotiating a final design contract with Lockheed for several months, which officials hope to complete in weeks.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Where did the Sacklers move cash from their opioid maker

Ninety minutes outside London, a turn down a narrow lane leads past fields of grazing cattle to a sign warning “Private Keep Off.” Around an elbow bend, a great stone manor, its formal gardens and tennis court hidden behind thick hedges, commands a 5,000-acre estate.The estate is a pastoral prize — proof of the great wealth belonging to the family accused of playing a key role in triggering the U.S. opioid epidemic. But there’s little evidence of that connection. On paper, the land is owned by seven companies, most based in distant Bermuda, all controlled by an offshore trust.The haziness surrounding the estate hints at one of the challenges for government lawyers as they eye a potential settlement with Purdue Pharma L.P. and its owners, the Sackler family, for their alleged role in flooding communities with prescription painkillers.All but two U.S. states and 2,000 local governments have taken legal action against Purdue, other drugmakers and distributors. Sixteen states have sued family members by name, alleging they steered Purdue while draining more than $4 billion from the company since 2007. That’s when the Oxycontin maker pleaded guilty to misleading doctors, patients and regulators about the drug’s risks.Purdue’s CEO has said the company could file for bankruptcy. And news organizations have reported that Purdue, the family and government lawyers are negotiating a possible settlement , valued at $10 billion to $12 billion, that would see the Sacklers give up company ownership and contribute $3 billion of their own money.But where, exactly, did the money withdrawn from Purdue over the years end up? And how much might the family be holding that state and local governments should consider fair game?Answers are complicated by the way the Sacklers have shielded their wealth in an intricate web of companies and trusts, a review by The Associated Press has found. Some are registered in offshore tax havens far from Purdue’s Connecticut headquarters.The web’s complexity and offshore reach could affect the calculus for government lawyers as they weigh how to go after Purdue, including how to calibrate demands in settlement talks.“The Sacklers allegedly moved significant money offshore, which potentially would make it harder for any judgment creditor to reach,” said Mark Chalos, a lawyer representing counties and cities including Nashville, Tennessee, in suits against opioids makers.“This is the real question and you’re seeing it playing out in a lot of different states in different ways,” said Elizabeth Chamblee Burch, a professor of law at the University of Georgia. “How do you make sure that they (the Sacklers) are not siphoning off those assets and hiding them away?”A representative for the family of Purdue co-founder Mortimer Sackler declined to comment for this story, as did a company spokeswoman. A representative for the relatives of Raymond Sackler, Purdue’s other scion, did not respond to a request for comment.Purdue and the Sacklers have long relied on a coterie of attorneys and accountants, as well as the family’s closely held ownership of the company, to keep their business and personal dealings private.But AP’s review of court papers, securities filings by companies that have had dealings with Purdue, and documents leaked from an exclusive Bermuda law firm, show how family members have tried to protect their wealth.Purdue — controlled through layers of limited partnerships, holding companies and trusts — is at the centre of the family’s web. But it hardly ends there.In Purdue’s 2007 plea agreement with federal prosecutors, it listed 215 companies under its corporate umbrella. But that list did not include a number of companies used to manage property and investments for family members or the trusts, some offshore, set up to administer their fortunes.Some offshore entities “appear to have served as conduits for monies from Purdue,” a lawyer for New York’s attorney general wrote recently to the judge presiding over the state’s lawsuit.New York has issued subpoenas to 33 Sackler companies, advisers and banks in the U.S., seeking details about money transferred out of Purdue. It is asking for court assistance to demand that four offshore entities also provide information about millions of dollars that “should be clawed back.”Many companies set up limited partnerships and country-specific subsidiaries to cap liabilities for shareholders, and many wealthy individuals manage their investments through opaque entities.But an examination of the Sacklers’ web shows striking complexity and a desire for secrecy, while revealing links between far-flung holdings.The British estate, known as Rooksnest and acquired before Purdue introduced Oxycontin, is one example. The manor is the domain of Theresa Sackler, widow of one of Purdue’s founders and, until last year, a member of the company’s board of directors. Set in the West Berkshire countryside, it includes a stone mansion that dates to the 16th century, 10 acres of formal gardens and expansive pastures for heritage cattle, red deer and wheat.It’s run by a Bermuda company called Earls Court Farm Limited, records filed with UK authorities show. But some of the land is owned by five more companies, three also in Bermuda. Earls Court is owned by yet another offshore company. And all the companies are controlled by a trust, based on Jersey in the Channel Islands.Public filings don’t show who actually owns the estate, and gardeners at the site told an AP photographer they could not answer questions. But documents leaked from Appleby, a Bermuda law firm employed by numerous wealthy clients, show that the companies belong to the Sacklers, among at least 30 island-based entities controlled through family trusts.Indeed, the leaked documents show that the trustee of the British estate also controls a Sackler company named in U.S. securities filing as one of Purdue’s two “ultimate parents.”Some states have also sued that firm, Beacon Co., based in the Channel Islands, along with Purdue and the Sacklers. New York state is seeking to subpoena the offshore trust company used to control both Beacon and the British estate.It has long been known that the Sacklers use Bermuda as a base for Mundipharma, a network of companies set up to do business outside North America. But their island portfolio also includes family foundations, real estate holding companies and an insurer, according to documents leaked in 2017 to the German newspaper Suddeutsche Zeitung. The documents are part of millions known as the Paradise Papers that were shared with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists which provided access to the AP.The Sacklers’ use of offshore holding companies and trusts is telling, said Jeffrey Winters, a Northwestern University professor whose research focuses on how the powerful protect their fortunes.“One would not put those trusts there if you didn’t see some wealth defence benefit,” Winters said. “It’s very hard to see what’s in there and it’s very hard to seize what’s in there. That’s the purpose.”But David S. Neufeld, an international tax lawyer who works with wealthy clients and closely held companies, said the layered, partly offshore structure used to control Purdue, while not typical, is also not that uncommon.“Somewhere in this picture is a desire to limit exposure to business liabilities. That’s not, in and of itself, a problem. That’s the very nature” of setting up a corporation, Neufeld said.The Sacklers had an estimated net worth of $13 billion as of 2016, making them America’s 19th-richest family, according to Forbes magazine. One of their largest holdings outside pharmaceuticals appears to be an estimated $1.7 billion portfolio in a family company, Cap 1 LLC, that recently sold its stake in 17 U.S. ski resorts.Massachusetts, New York and other states are alleging that the family has worked methodically to move money out of Purdue to insulate their fortune.At a meeting in December 2010, for example, the Sacklers and other board members approved the withdrawal of $261.3 million from Purdue, according to company records recently made public in the Massachusetts case, the first to name individual family members. Until recently, eight Sacklers served on Purdue’s board.The board instructed that the money be passed through three layers of holding companies, then split equally between Beacon Co. and Rosebay Medical Co., the other “ultimate parent” of Purdue. Both are controlled by Sackler trusts.“Do you know whether any of these sums distributed between 2008 and 2011 made their way into any bank account over which you had control?” an attorney asked Dr. Kathe Sackler, one of the family members who approved the transfers, during a deposition this past April.“I hope so,” she answered, according to a partial transcript recently made public in court filings. “I think so.”The family’s withdrawal of substantial sums from Purdue was noted by Dr. Richard Sackler, the former president and chairman, in a 2014 email to his sons, filed as an exhibit in court proceedings.“In the years when the business was producing massive amounts of cash,” he wrote, “the shareholders departed from the practice of our industry peers and took the money out of the business.”He did not need to remind his sons that the only shareholders of Purdue are Sacklers.It is not clear where the money drawn from Purdue ended up. New York’s attorney general alleges that the Sacklers sent it offshore to “unknown trusts, partnerships, companies” and other entities they control.The possibilities are numerous. When family members directed payments to Rosebay Medical, for example, the company served as much more than a parent of Purdue. It is also the owner-of-record for Sackler companies spread from Poland to New Zealand, corporate registries in those countries show.Rosebay is run from an office in Oklahoma City that manages many family holdings. When David Sackler, son of one of Purdue’s founders, paid $22.5 million last year for a mansion in Los Angeles’ Bel Air neighbourhood, the executive who administers Rosebay served as his representative for the purchase.Lawsuits allege that the Sacklers’ money management decisions were framed by their awareness of state investigations of Purdue.“Despite this knowledge, the Sackler defendants continued to vote to have Purdue pay the Sackler Families significant distributions and send money to offshore companies,” Nevada’s lawsuit says.Family members voiced concerns about threats to their holdings.“While things are looking better now,” Mortimer D.A. Sackler wrote to his cousins months after Purdue’s 2007 guilty plea, and quoted in Connecticut’s lawsuit, “I would not count out the possibility that times will get much more difficult again in the future and probably much sooner than we expect.”Purdue agreed in March to a $270 million settlement with the state of Oklahoma to avoid going to trial. That included $75 million from the Sacklers.A federal judge in Cleveland overseeing suits by local governments has pushed all parties to work toward a nationwide settlement. The resulting negotiations have included representatives for some of the state attorneys general who have filed suit.The first federal trials are scheduled to start in October. Unless there’s a settlement, family members could face more questions about their decisions to move money out of Purdue, some of it offshore.At trial, lawyers for states and cities would “need to prove that the transfer of the money to these offshore accounts were made with fraudulent intent,” said William J. Moon, a professor of law at the University of Maryland.States can ask courts to order the return of such money to satisfy a legal judgment. But going after money moved offshore would be time-consuming and expensive, with few guarantees, Moon and others said.Governments suing the company could start by asking judges to order the seizure of Sackler assets in the U.S., pending an eventual verdict, said Gregory Grossman, a Miami attorney specializing in international insolvency. That would require convincing a judge that they’re likely to win the case. But it would be far easier than getting a U.S. judge to freeze offshore assets, he said.“How comfortable is the court with ordering the seizure of things that are not in their jurisdiction?” Grossman said. “If they are comfortable, will they get co-operation with folks on the other side of the pond?”If Purdue files for bankruptcy, all the company’s assets would be considered fair game for creditors. But the company’s coffers are separate from the family’s own wealth.Unless a state had already won their case by that point, a bankruptcy filing by Purdue would put lawsuits against it on hold, said Jessica Gabel Cino, a professor of law at Georgia State University.As states decide how to proceed, they could find lessons in efforts to recover money lost in broker Bernard Madoff’s infamous Ponzi scheme.A court-appointed trustee has long sought money Madoff paid out to investors in offshore “feeder funds,” using cash others entrusted to him. Madoff was arrested in December 2008. But just this February, a federal judge ruled that the money Madoff directed offshore had to be returned.The ruling, though, is likely to be appealed.___Associated Press photographer Frank Augstein in Lambourn Woodlands, England, and researchers Randy Herschaft and Rhonda Shafner in New York contributed to this story.Adam Geller, The Associated Press read more

Which Countries Medal In The Sports That People Care About

Puerto Rico01120011 Bulgaria01120000 Track and field2,300471.0 Singapore00220055 Gymnastics1,442142.0 Soccer1,300212.9 Canada151218122124 Modern pentathlon3220.3 * Golf and rugby are new Olympic sports for 2016. Viewership is estimated based on regression analysis.** Boxing, judo, taekwondo and wrestling award two bronze medals in each event. As a result, they have a lower medal multiplier for bronze medals: 0.3 for boxing and judo, 0.2 for wrestling and 0.1 for taekwondo.Source: Olympic.org Russia2426328225233280 N. Korea40262013 Uzbekistan10230011 Grenada10011001 Venezuela10010000 Bahamas10011001 COUNTRYGOLDSILVERBRONZETOTALGOLDSILVERBRONZETOTAL Weightlifting320150.4 Canoe/kayak195160.2 Handball26522.6 Sweden14380516 Shooting215150.3 Afghanistan00110000 Rowing196140.3 Triathlon10021.0 Switzerland22042204 Related: Hot Takedown Kazakhstan715134116 Tajikistan00110000 Boxing**302130.5 Tennis37151.5 Belgium01230011 Slovenia11241113 Field hockey23322.3 Cyprus01010000 Botswana01010101 Mongolia02350112 Slovakia01340011 ORIGINAL 2012 MEDAL COUNTADJUSTED FOR SPORT POPULARITY Colombia13481214 Tunisia11131113 S. Korea138728861731 Team sports almost invariably wind up with large medal multipliers, including soccer (12.9), basketball (8.0) and even water polo (1.9). Swimming (0.9) and track and field (1.0) hold their own; they’re very popular, but also medal-rich, so there isn’t much need to adjust their numbers one way or the other. Gymnastics gets a boost, though, as does diving (1.9). But many of the more obscure individual sports, such as shooting (0.4), sailing (0.2) and taekwondo (0.2), have low multipliers.How would these adjustments have affected the 2012 Olympic standings? Among other things, they’d have helped the United States, which already led the way with 46 gold and 103 overall medals in London. A lot of those medals came in team sports, such as basketball, volleyball and (women’s) soccer, which have high medal multipliers. Thus, Team USA’s adjusted medal count is 78 golds and 142 medals overall, towering over the competition. Archery16240.8 Norway21143014 U.S.462829103783925142 Egypt02020101 Taekwondo**8880.2 We’re on the ground in Rio covering the 2016 Summer Olympics. Check out all our coverage here.Because the Summer Olympics occur during presidential election years, I have to pick my viewing opportunities carefully. I won’t always have the time or patience to watch much water polo or beach volleyball, sports that involve a lot of buildup — dozens of preliminary matches — all leading up to a gold-medal match that I’ll probably forget to watch anyway.1The Winter Olympics are another story: MORE CURLING, PLEASE. Instead, I’m mostly interested in sports such as swimming and track and field, which provide plenty of bang for the buck, with somebody (probably an American) winning a medal pretty much every other time you look.Not everyone agrees with this philosophy, though. Track and field and swimming are indeed very popular, ranking as the top two sports for Olympics TV viewership, followed by gymnastics in third. But soccer ranks fourth. It awards just two gold medals, one each for the men’s and women’s champions, while sailing awards 10. And yet — even if people don’t care as much about Olympic soccer as they do the World Cup or the Champions League — soccer has 15 times the Olympics TV audience that sailing does.So, what if Olympics medals were awarded in proportion to how much people actually cared about each sport, as measured by its TV viewership? To reiterate, I’m talking about TV viewership during the Olympics, specifically. Tennis (as in: Wimbledon) is presumably the more popular spectator sport under ordinary circumstances, but in 2012, people actually spent more time watching table tennis (as in: pingpong) than tennis at the Olympics.The data I’m citing here comes from the IOC’s International Federations Report, which listed the total number of TV viewer hours in each sport during the 2012 London Olympics. People around the world spent a collective 202 million hours watching Olympics fencing in 2012, for example. The list of the most popular sports is less U.S.-centric than you might think: Badminton, not very popular in the United States, gets a lot of TV viewers worldwide.There are just a couple of complications. First, some Olympic federations cover more than one sport, as people usually define them. FINA, for example, governs swimming, diving, water polo and synchronized swimming2Technically the Olympics committee calls diving a discipline, which is organized under one sport, aquatics., and the IOC’s report aggregated their TV viewership together. I used data on London Olympics ticket revenues as a proxy for the relative popularity of these sports, in order to split the TV audiences accordingly.3Specifically, I used data on ticket revenues, excluding tickets sold to residents of the United Kingdom, on the assumption that this would help to correct for sports that are more popular in the U.K. than they are worldwide. Second, golf and rugby are new to the Olympics this year, so I estimated their TV viewership using regression analysis.4The regression was based on the revenue tier in which the IOC ranked each sport — golf and rugby are in the lowest tier along with modern pentathlon — and the number of ticketed sessions for each sport. Ticketed sessions is a proxy for the overall number of broadcast hours available. A sport like handball can slowly accumulate viewers, even it doesn’t have very many of them at any one time.Otherwise, the analysis is pretty straightforward. I calculated a medal multiplier for each sport, such that the value of medals is proportional to the amount of time people spent watching it. Gymnastics, for instance, represented about 4.5 percent of the medals awarded in 2012, but around 9 percent of the TV viewership. It therefore needs a medal multiplier of 2 to bring things into proportion.5For boxing, judo, taekwondo and wrestling, which award two bronze medals per event, I use a smaller medal multiplier for bronze medals. Brazil359178271146 Azerbaijan226101124 Germany1119144414161141 Kenya2451124511 France11111335915832 The Subtle (And Not So Subtle) Dominance Of U.S. Swimmers And Gymnasts Cycling564180.6 China also gets a modest boost, thanks in part to its gymnastics and table tennis prowess, while Brazil — great at soccer and volleyball, not so good at the individual sports — gets a large one. The country that suffers the most is Great Britain, which used its home-nation advantage to rack up medals in some of the more obscure sports. Nations from Eastern Europe and Central Asia, which win lots of medals in relatively unpopular events such as weightlifting and wrestling, also suffer to some extent. Hong Kong00110011 Armenia01230011 USA dominates adjusted medal count Rhythmic gymnastics9220.9 Rugby*14121.4 Portugal01010000 Greece00220011 Italy891128351220 Belarus255122338 Wrestling**318180.3 Equestrian18160.6 Finland01230011 Croatia31263036 Latvia10121089 India02460134 Serbia11240022 Great Britain2917196517101845 New Zealand625132125 Volleyball51925.1 Diving78481.9 Ukraine6592022610 Malaysia01120224 Ethiopia31373137 Poland226101124 Denmark24391337 SPORTVIEWER HOURS (MILLIONS)EVENTSMEDAL MULTIPLIER Trampoline6720.7 Source: Sports-Reference.com Argentina11240224 Cuba536142226 Swimming1,509340.9 Beach volleyball78127.7 Ireland11351113 Uganda10011001 Trinidad and Tobago11241124 Montenegro01010303 Lithuania21251012 Turkey22151102 Bahrain00110011 Guatemala01010101 Basketball80428.0 Jamaica4441244412 S. Africa32162204 Estonia01120011 Spain310417115420 Romania25292428 Gabon01010000 Iran453121214 Thailand02130101 Dominican Rep.11021102 Water polo19421.9 Moldova00220011 Qatar00220011 Table tennis46142.3 Fencing202100.4 Judo**443140.6 Algeria10011001 Morocco00110011 Georgia13371113 Golf*9420.9 Japan71417384281648 China38272388503020100 Badminton56252.2 What if medals were awarded in proportion to a sport’s popularity? Indonesia01120000 Taiwan01120000 Australia71612353121833 Kuwait00110000 Synchronized swimming11321.1 Sailing87100.2 Mexico1337135321 Saudi Arabia00110011 Netherlands6682075416 Hungary846186129 Czech Rep.433102226 We’ll check in on these numbers again at the end of the 2016 Rio games. They may even make inexplicably popular beach volleyball — medal multiplier 7.7 — worth your time to watch. read more

Speeding drivers could be fined nearly double their weekly income as penalties

first_imgSpeed camera Traffic police patrol the M4.  Drivers could be banned from the roads for 56 daysCredit:Ian Jones “While sat navs and smartphones are an incredibly useful tool for motorists, it is important to remember they are never a complete substitute for knowing the rules of the road.” More than half of drivers who took part in a survey by the price comparison firm, uSwitch, admitted they did not know the correct speed limits for single and dual carriageways.A third also admitted that they rarely updated their sat navs, meaning they were likely to be given out of date information where roads were subject to variable speed limits.Rod Jones, insurance expert at uSwitch.com, said: “We are officially a nation of sat nav junkies, but our addiction to technology is causing us to drive dangerously and risk large fines. Speed camera-carrying motorcycleCredit:Barry Batchelor/PA New sentencing powers aimed at deterring speeding drivers will come into force next week with the worst offenders facing big increases in fines.From Monday, motorists who travel at excessively dangerous speeds, including those who exceed 100 mph on motorways, could be fined up to 175 per cent of their weekly income.In addition to the new fines, they could also be banned from driving for 56 days and have six points added to their licence.But while road safety charities have welcomed the move, there is concern that the fines will have little impact on behaviour because there are too few traffic officers on the roads to enforce them. Gary Rae, campaigns director for Brake, also said the increase in fines was long overdue, but said the government had to ensure the resources were available to enforce them.He said: “I hope that magistrates ensure the new sentences are consistently applied. It is also vital that a new government look afresh at police resources and make traffic policing a national priority, so that speeding drivers know they will be caught and punished.”The introduction of the new top rate fines has opened the government up to accusations that they are attempting to raise revenue through the scheme, with any cash going to the Treasury.Roger Lawson of the Association of British Drivers said any extra revenue could help recoup some of the huge court costs involved in prosecuting motorists.Meanwhile it has emerged that millions of motorists could be inadvertently speeding because they have been given wrong information by their sat navs. With police forces having to make millions of pounds worth of cuts, many have chosen to reduce the number of traffic patrols.Figures show that between 2005 and 2014 the number of specialist road officers in England and Wales reduced from 7,104 to 4,356.Last year a group of MPs warned that sharp falls in the number of recorded motoring offences was more likely to be down to the lack of patrols rather than an improvement in driving standards.RAC road safety spokesman, Pete Williams, said: “We welcome the change in sentencing guidelines for gross speeders. Anyone who breaks the limit excessively is a danger to every other road user and is unnecessarily putting lives at risk.“Hopefully, hitting these offenders harder in the pocket will make them think twice before doing it again in the future.But he added: “Tougher penalties are only effective in changing behaviour or increasing compliance if drivers genuinely believe that they are likely to be caught and prosecuted for breaking the law. speed camera-carrying motorcycle “With a significantly reduced number of dedicated roads police officers you have to question whether increased fines alone will change the attitude of excessive speeders.” Credit:Jay Williams Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

These are the four richest counties in Ireland

first_img Wednesday 22 Mar 2017, 2:00 PM Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article 35 Comments The figures come from CSO analysis of incomes in 2014. Image: Julien Behal/PA Images Short URL Image: Julien Behal/PA Images http://jrnl.ie/3300484 Share89 Tweet Email9 center_img By Rónán Duffy Mar 22nd 2017, 2:00 PM 80,871 Views ONLY FOUR COUNTIES in the Republic of Ireland have a disposable income per person greater than the State’s average.Those counties are Dublin, Limerick, Cork, and Kildare.The results are contained in figures released by the Central Statistics Office for the year of 2014 and also show that the gap between Dublin as the richest region and the border region as the poorest has widened over the past number of years.Disposable income includes primary income plus social welfare payments minus taxes and social insurance contributions.On a per person basis, the disposal income in Dublin comes to €21,963 compared to a nationwide average of €19,178.Limerick’s is the second highest at €20,395, ahead of Kildare at €19,385 and Cork at €19,234.The counties with the greatest deductions from their primary incomes include those four counties as well as Meath, Wicklow, Kilkenny and Galway. Source: CSO.ie(Dublin’s disposable income is greater than 110% above the national average while the counties in purple are above 100%)Donegal has the lowest average disposable income at €15,061, with the counties of Roscommon (€16,281), Monaghan (€16,395) and Offaly (€16,460) just above that.As is evident from that list, the border region has the lowest disposable income on a regional basis with an average of €16,601.It means that the gap between the border region and Dublin now stands at €5,362, almost €800 more than was the difference in the previous year.The CSO also notes that the gap between Dublin and rest of the regions decreased during the period of peak austerity but has since widened again.“Viewed from this longer term perspective (from 2006 onwards) the divergence in income between the regions and Dublin was at its lowest in 2010 but has continued to widen in  2011,  2012  2013 and 2014,” the CSO states.Read: Filling your car is becoming very, very expensive – here’s why >Read: 32 beautiful celebrations of every county in Ireland > The figures come from CSO analysis of incomes in 2014. These are the four richest counties in Ireland Only four counties have a disposable income ahead of the national average. last_img read more

Firefox deux extensions infectées supprimées

first_imgFirefox : deux extensions infectées suppriméesÉtats-Unis – La fondation Mozilla a retiré deux extensions de son navigateur Firefox, contenant de nombreux malwares. 4.600 personnes auraient vu leur machine infectée.La fondation Mozilla a émis un bulletin d’alerte la semaine dernière concernant deux extensions de son navigateur Firefox : Sothink Web Video Downloader 4.0 et Master Filer ont été retirés car ces applications contiennent de nombreux malwares actifs sous Windows uniquement.Ces virus sont identifiés sous les noms de “Win32.LdPinch.gen” et “Win32.Bifrose.32.Bifrose”. Ils se manifestent dès que Firefox est ouvert. Pour les supprimer, il ne suffit pas de désinstaller le navigateur : il est nécessaire de recourir à un antivirus à jour.Le 8 février 2010 à 12:51 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

Out with a whimper Storms over in East South

first_imgPORTLAND, Maine — The remnants of a violent storm that claimed 13 lives in Oklahoma and sent punishing winds and torrential downpours to northern New England and a tornado to South Carolina moved out to sea with a whimper Monday.The National Weather Service said Sunday’s storms sheared off trees and utility poles in parts of northern New England, dropped ping pong ball-sized hail in New York state and caused a tornado to touch down in South Carolina.On Monday morning, the storm was blowing out to sea with only isolated thunderstorms and localized heavy rain in some areas as a cold front began moving in and clearing the region. “There will be some thunderstorm activity, but the risk of severe weather has pretty much disappeared on the East Coast,” said Bruce Terry, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service’s weather prediction center in College Park, Md.At the peak of the storm, more than 40,000 homes and businesses were without power in Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine. That number had fallen to about 12,000 on Monday morning, with utilities hopeful to have most power restored by the end of the day.last_img read more

Cameras capture Hollywood car crook

first_imgHOLLYWOOD, FLA. (WSVN) – Police are searching for a car crook in Hollywood.The man was caught on camera opening the door of an unlocked white Ford Focus and going inside.According to officials, he stole a laptop, DVR recorder, sunglasses and a jumper cable.The break-in was at a home on Van Buren Street and South 44th Avenue.If you have any information on this crime, call Broward County Crime Stoppers at 954-493-TIPS. Remember, you can always remain anonymous, and you may be eligible for a $3,000 reward.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img

Sony and Yamaha will build this boxy mobility van

first_img Post a comment Enlarge ImageAmusement park attendees, your ride has arrived. Sony The Sony-Yamaha SC-1 Sociable Cart could only come from Japan with its boxy, robotic look. And if you like it, there’s good news — it’s actually going into production.The SC-1 Sociable Cart, based on Sony’s SC-1 New Concept Cart, will enter production via a partnership with Yamaha, the companies said last Wednesday. The SC-1 New Concept Cart debuted in 2017; since then Sony put the boxy mobility van into prototype testing on a Japanese golf course. Following feedback from the trials, Sony and Yamaha created what you see here. Unlike the original concept, the SC-1 Sociable Cart has room for five passengers instead of three and a longer operation time thanks to replaceable batteries. Other improvements include an even smarter feedback system with the inclusion of more image sensors. Sony said the front and rear scopes are improved, specifically. An operator can also control the vehicle via a cloud system.The wildest part of the SC-1 Sociable Cart is the fact it actually doesn’t have windows. The mentioned image sensors instead capture the scenery and display the outside world on monitors for passengers. While that sounds unnecessary, Sony said it allows anyone onboard to see the world in high resolution with feeds displayed only in focus all the time. Further, passengers can see things at night in crystal clarity.With no windows comes great opportunity for advertisers, and this is where it starts to sound rather cumbersome. The Japanese company said the van’s artificial intelligence can gather information about the ages and genders of people outside the vehicle to display interactive and custom advertisements. Yay, ads. Meanwhile, the inside can take advantage of mixed-reality technology with overlays cast onto the screen displays. Think of a program to display interesting facts as the SC-1 Sociable Cart crawls by a tourist area or something along those lines.All the while, a lidar system ensures the van sees the world and drives autonomously and provides opportunities for “deep learning analysis” to become a better driver after every trip.Locals will find the boxy people mover employed at places such as amusement parks, golf courses and other similar facilities by the end of this year. 18 Photos 8:16 Share your voice BMW rocks up at CES 2019 with a self-driving bike and… More From Roadshow 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Now playing: Watch this:center_img 2019 Chevy Malibu review: Swing and a miss 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 0 Ford’s ‘self-driving’ delivery vans bamboozle the public for good reason Tags Autonomous Vehicles Yamaha Sony Self-driving carslast_img read more

New BNP names in old cases

first_imgPolice arrest a BNP man from a procession in Bijoynagar of the capital. File PhotoThe police have put over 3,500 people behind the bars on or before the verdict in the Zia orphanage Trust graft case that convicted BNP chairperson Khaleda Zia.Some 3,000 of them were shown arrested in old cases while most of their names were not mentioned in the charge sheets, official records suggest.Allegations have it that many were victims of harassment at the hands of the police and had to bribe them to avoid arrest or get free after being detained.The law enforcement, however, claimed the arrests had been made as security was beefed up in the lead up to the verdict.On 30 January, BNP activists allegedly attacked a police van in the High Court area when Khaleda Zia was returning from the court. Indiscriminate arrests across the country soon followed and it continued for 16 days, till 14 February.According to Prothom Alo’s investigation, as many as 1,200 people were arrested in Dhaka in those 16 days while 2,682 people were detained in other places of the country.Court documents show 940 people were arrested in 105 cases in Dhaka and sent to the court. Among the cases, 20 are under the Special Powers Act and 30 under the Explosives Act.The other cases were filed for obstructing government work, launching attacks on the police, engaging in vandalism and setting fire to belongings. At least 250 people were put on remand for interrogation.These two correspondents spoke to the family members and lawyers of at least 50 arrestees on the court and Dhaka Central Jail (Keraniganj) premises on 7, 8 and 9 February.They said these people had been picked up from their offices or residences, or from the streets and then shown arrested in different cases filed between March and December last year. The police could not explain how most of the people were framed in new cases.Rabeda Begum, mother of Abdul Gafur, an employee of a hardware shop in Old Dhaka, said her son was picked up on 7 February. She first went to the police station where she learnt that he was sent to the court. After waiting for long hours at the court’s detention cell, she could see her son. She was told that he was shown arrested in an explosives act filed with Kotwali police station in last November.Haji Abdul Mazid, 63, was arrested on the basis of mere suspicion on 2 February. He was then sent to the jail on charges of attacking the police and in another case under explosives act filed on 19 June last year. His lawyer Masudul Hasan said his client, despite being sick, was denied a bail.Dhaka Metropolitan Police commissioner Asaduzzaman Mia, however, claimed that everyone had been arrested for valid reasons.However, the reality is somewhat different.Mushtaq Ahmed, an Awami League activist for an example, had been arrested as the police suspected him to be a BNP man. His lawyer Mahbubur Rahman Khan said Mushtaq came to Dhaka from Kishoreganj to see a doctor.The police showed him arrested in a case filed on 30 January with Ramna police station under Special Powers Act. Mushtaq, however, was not named among the 142 accused in the charge sheet of the case.The lawyer has submitted to the court affidavit signed by Awami League leaders of Kishoreganj indentifying Mushtaq as an AL activist.Lawyers said the case under Special Powers Act and Explosives Act are non-bailable. It is also difficult to get a bail in the other cases these people have been arrested. As a result, they were subjected to immense suffering.Supreme Court’s lawyer Shahdeen Malik said that these people can sue the law enforcement demanding compensation for their turmoil.Bachchu Molla, organisational secretary of Nakole union BNP in Magura’s Sreepur upazila, was picked up by the law enforcement on 5 February on his way home from his rod and cement shop.His relatives told Prothom Alo that the police snatched cash and the mobile phone before arresting him. Initially he was shown arrested under Section 151, but he got a bail five days later. Afterwards, he was shown arrested in a case of murder that had taken place in an adjacent village.Nazma Khatun, the acting chairman of Kotchandpur upazila in Jhenidah district, was arrested in Explosives Act. Her husband Rafiq Mondol said to Prothom Alo he was later told that bombs were seized from their residence.A big number of arrestees in Brahmanbaria was shown arrested in connection with the clashes that took place centering the death of a madrasa student in January 2016. The relatives of one such victim, Shafiqur Rahman, told Prothom Alo that he returned home from Malaysia in February 2016.However, police showed him arrested in an incident that took place on 12 January that year.Officer-in-charge (OC) of Brahmanbaria sadar police station Nabir Hossain claimed that the police had only arrested those who were involved in different crimes.Almost similar statements have been made by assistant inspector general (media) of police headquarters Saheli Ferdous. “According to the information provided by the heads of different operational units, they have been arrested as there were cases against them and the police acted based on specific allegations,” said the AIG.However, the police could not provide a certain number as to how many have been arrested on or before Khaleda Zia’s verdict.On February 17, the BNP claimed that the police had arrested 4,725 of its leaders and activists from 30 January to 16 February.The police said these arrestees were mainly involved in acts of sabotage during the political unrests between 2013 and 2015. They have started issuing charge sheets in those cases now.National Human Rights Commission chairman Kazi Riazul Haque said it is the police’s duty to ensure security to the public. They can arrest those who are involved in destructive acts or those who are convicted of specific crimes.However, he added, indiscriminate arrest without any verification is not desirable.*The article, originally published in Prothom Alo print edition, has been rewritten in English by Quamrul Hassan.last_img read more

London fire death toll hits 30 but dozens missing

first_imgPolice and emergency workers wheel the remains of a victim at the site of the remains of Grenfell Tower, a residential tower block in west London which was gutted by fire, on 16 June, 2017. Photo: AFPAt least 30 people have been confirmed killed and dozens more are feared dead in the London tower block fire, police said on Friday, as firefighters continued searching for bodies amid outrage over the use of cladding blamed for spreading the flames.“We know that at least 30 people have died as a result of this fire… I do believe the number will increase,” police commander Stuart Cundy told reporters in front of the charred Grenfell Tower.Cundy said police had started a criminal investigation but there was nothing to suggest “that the fire had been started deliberately”.He also said the last flames had finally been put out, two days after the fire broke out in the night between Tuesday and Wednesday in the 24-storey tower in a working-class enclave of the wealthy London borough of Kensington and Chelsea.More than 70 people are unaccounted for, according to media reports, although it was not known whether some of those were among the bodies recovered so far.Police have warned some of the victims may never be identified because of the state of the remains.Cundy said one of the victims was a person who died in hospital. Twenty-four injured survivors are still being treated, 12 of them in critical care.Firefighters were using drones and sniffer dogs to search the building, saying that some of the upper floors are still inaccessible to humans because of concerns about the stability of the structure.Queen visits survivors -The area surrounding the council-owned tower has been plastered by desperate relatives with pictures of the missing, from grandparents to young children, and large numbers of volunteers were assisting survivors.Queen Elizabeth II and her grandson Prince William visited a community centre where some of the survivors are being housed, as anger grows among local residents about allegations that fire safety concerns were ignored for years.The government has ordered a judge-led inquiry into Wednesday’s disaster, which is under pressure to act quickly.“Something’s gone wrong here, something’s gone drastically wrong,” Communities and Local Government Minister Sajid Javid told BBC radio.Javid said inspections of similar buildings had been ordered, with particular attention to the modern cladding used to beautify and add an insulation layer to ageing concrete and steel structures.“We need to do whatever it takes to make people that live in those properties safe: that’s either make the properties safe or find some other accommodation, it has to be done,” he said, adding that survivors from the tower would be re-housed in the local area.Opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has called for houses in the area to be “requisitioned” for survivors.Syrian refugee victim -Prime Minister Theresa May has come under criticism for not meeting residents when she visited the site on Thursday to talk with emergency workers.She met with injured survivors in hospital on Friday.Locals yelled questions at mayor Sadiq Khan when he walked through the neighbourhood on Friday.“How many children died? What are you going to do about it?” a young boy asked Khan, as the mayor tried to stop tensions rising further.The fire forced residents to flee through black smoke down the single stairwell, jump out of windows or even drop their children to safety.One of the victims was named as Mohammed Alhajali, a 23-year-old Syrian refugee, who came to Britain in 2014 with his brother.“Mohammed undertook a dangerous journey to flee war and death in Syria, only to meet it here in the UK, in his own home,” the Syrian Solidarity Campaign said in a statement.Alhajali, who lived on the 14th floor, was a civil engineering student at West London University.“His dream was to be able to go back home one day and rebuild Syria,” the campaign group said.Cladding restricted in US -Questions are growing about how the flames spread so quickly, engulfing the tower’s 120 apartments in what fire chiefs said was an unprecedented blaze.The focus of criticism is on the cladding fitted to external walls of the 1974 tower as part of a £8.7 million ($11 million, 9.9 million euros) refit completed last year.According to media reports, the cladding had a plastic core and was similar to that used by high-rise buildings in France, the United Arab Emirates and Australia, which had also suffered fires that spread.The Times reported that the type of cladding used on the building was banned in US buildings taller than 40 feet (12.2 metres) because of fire safety fears.It said the company that manufactured the cladding also made fire-resistant models that cost fractionally more than the standard version.Harley Facades, which fitted the panels, said in a statement: “At this time, we are not aware of any link between the fire and the exterior cladding.”In addition to debate over the cladding, questions have also been raised over why there was no sprinkler system in the Grenfell Tower which could have helped stop the fire spreading, or any central smoke alarm system that would have woken sleeping residents.last_img read more

Poor paying the price for global trends UN

first_imgUN flag. File PhotoPeople living in poverty around the world are facing increasing multiple threats, including climate change and the global economic crisis, but the political will to tackle the issues is lacking, a United Nations human rights expert has warned in his maiden report to the Human Rights Council.The first UN Special Rapporteur on the right to development, Saad Alfarargi, issued a rallying cry for the international community and agencies to wake up to the scale of the problem and step up their responses.“More than 30 years after the right to development was established in a UN declaration, millions of people around the world are living with the consequences of the failure to deliver it,” he was quoted as saying in a statement UNB received here from Geneva on Friday.He said negative global trends have their harshest impacts on the poorest sections of society. “People are feeling the impact of the global financial and economic crisis, the energy and climate crisis, and an increasing number of natural disasters.Add to that the new global pandemics, corruption, the privatization of public services, austerity, and the ageing of the global population, including in developing countries, and the effect is a harsh and worsening impact on the poor, said the UN expert.“We are witnessing some of the greatest challenges the world has ever seen, without the global commitment to deliver change. People in developing countries are paying a heavy price for global actions beyond their control.”The Special Rapporteur said the international community could not even agree on exactly what the right to development meant, or how to measure progress, and the issue had become increasingly politicised.“This political divide has resulted in a low level of engagement of United Nations agencies and civil society in promoting, protecting and fulfilling the right to development,” Alfarargi noted.He added: “Too many people are unaware that the right to development even exists. We need to raise this low level of awareness, from grassroots organizations to governments, and make sure they are all fully engaged in implementing it.“The right to development is far from being universally recognized and even further from full implementation,” the Special Rapporteur stressed.Alfarargi said many of the building blocks for change were already available.“Global agreements are in place to deliver global solutions,” he said, highlighting the Sustainable Development Goals – which aim to deliver radical change by 2030 – and the Paris agreement on climate change. He highlighted the progress on financing development, set out in the Addis Ababa Action Agenda, and on ways to build safer cities in Sendai Framework for disaster risk reduction.“All UN agencies, development agencies, financial and trade institutions – in short any group working for development – should put the right to development at the centre of their work,” the expert added.“There is an urgent need to make the right to development a reality for everyone,” said Alfarargi who took up his role in May.last_img read more

Baltimores Section 8 Waiting List to Open for First Time in Over

first_imgBaltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced the reopening of the city’s Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher Program (HCVP) Waiting List, Oct. 6. According to the Housing Authority of Baltimore City (HABC), this marks the first time in over 10 years that the list has been open to receive preliminary applications.From Oct. 22 through Oct. 30, residents wanting to apply for a Housing Choice Voucher, a federally funded but locally managed program that helps low-income persons afford housing on the private rental market, will be able to submit a preliminary application.  Applications will only be accepted online, via the city’s newly minted website www.jointhelist.org. To assist those who may not have access to the internet, or who may need special accommodations, the city will operate five remote sites between Oct. 28 and Oct. 30.In order to accept new applications, the city has been continually updating and purging the existing list since 2003, when it was closed down after ballooning to over 18,000 persons (for persons or families with disabilities, the waiting list had remained open until 2008). According to Cheron Porter, director of communications for Baltimore Housing, of the last batch of 2,700 names on the waiting list that the city cleared, some were deemed no longer eligible for a voucher (for example, some persons on the list had since passed away), some were removed because the city no longer had valid addresses for them, and approximately 300 persons were able to receive vouchers.The city is not sure how many people may submit preliminary applications over the course of the nine-day window at the end of October, but Porter tells the {AFRO} that Pittsburgh, Penn. went through a similar process recently and saw 48,000 applications in two days, and that Miami saw 78,000 over the course of a week when the Southern Florida city reopened its waiting list.“We suspect that it would be comparable (in Baltimore), those are cities similar in size and need,” said Porter.If that is the case, there will be more applications than there are available waiting list spaces. According to an FAQ released by the city about the reopening of the waiting list, only 25,000 preliminary applications will be accepted.  If more than that number apply, the 25,000 will be selected randomly from the overall pool of preliminary applicants.Those wanting more information on the process or eligibility requirements, are being directed to www.jointhelist.org, or to call (410) 396-5666.ralejandro@afro.comlast_img read more

Mariah Careys All I Want for Christmas Tops YouTubes Holiday Songs Chart

first_imgThe No. 2 slot on the YouTube Holiday Songs Chart this year is occupied by Idina Menzel’s “Let It Go” from 2013’s animated film “Frozen,” with daily views reaching 4.7 million on Christmas Eve 2017 — its peak for the entire year.Here is the full list for the most played holiday songs in the U.S. (December 2018):Mariah Carey – “All I Want for Christmas Is You”Idina Menzel – “Let It Go” (From “Frozen”)Gene Autry – “Rudolph, The Red Nosed Reindeer”Pentatonix – “Hallelujah”Brenda Lee – “Rockin’ Around The Christmas Tree”Pentatonix – “Little Drummer Boy”Ariana Grande – “Santa Tell Me”Wham! – “Last Christmas”Bobby Helms – “Jingle Bell Rock”Pentatonix – “Mary, Did You Know? (feat. The String Mob)” ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15 Popular on Variety center_img Mariah Carey’s 1994 Christmas classic “All I Want for Christmas Is You” is the most-viewed holiday song in the United States and globally throughout December, YouTube has reported.It received increased views in the past few months, with the tune spiking Nov. 1, the day following Thanksgiving, and Dec. 1. Daily views of the song this year have passed 4.5 million, and it’s likely that number will rise, as last year’s daily global views reached 10.7 million on Christmas Eve.The holiday bop reached the YouTube Top Songs chart this week in 26 countries, including the United Kingdom, Germany, Italy, Iceland, Australia, Japan, and the United States. It is currently No. 13 on the Global Top Songs Chart.On Monday, it was reported that Carey’s song is the highest-charting holiday hit in 50 years on the Billboard Hot 100, as it rises from No. 7 to No. 6. The carol is the top-charting song of the season on the Hot 100 since “The Chipmunk Song” by David Seville and the Chipmunks, which hit No. 1 on Dec. 22, 1958, and maintained its position for four weeks.last_img read more

New Star Wars Anthology Book Celebrates 40 Years of the Franchise

first_img When George Lucas wrote the screenplay for A New Hope, I wonder if he ever thought his heroes journey story arc would spawn into so many different side stories in the future to come? Once Luke, Han, Leia and Vader’s story presumably ended, Star Wars became “The Fans Story.” Not only were kids creating their own adventures with their action figures, but publishers were given the rights to expand on the already growing galactic phenomenon. Authors like Timothy Zahn, Steve Perry, and Michael A. Stackpole were brought in to expand the Star Wars universe in so many different ways. They were given one of the most fun universes to play in. Some were strictly told not to meddle with the main cast, but have fun with any alien race you’d like, pilots you’d want to know more about, bounty hunters you’ve been itching to flesh out. These side stories were all fans had for quite a while and slowly became canon in their universe.Fast forward to the present and the powers that be have drawn a firm line in the sand as to what is canon and what simply are legends. Either way, these intergalactic tales touch us in many ways that most stories do not. We are familiar with the planets, ships, and races. Even down to the color of milk in the universe. These side stories are crucial to the main events in the Star Wars universe and truly make it all feel more alive.Luckily for us fans, a beautiful book is being published by Penguin Random House that brings some of the best Star Wars authors together to tell some rather unique tales. Most of the book centers around the main events of the first film. To celebrate the 40th anniversary of this epic tale, Del Ray has pulled together 40 fantastic authors to spin 40 different tales that will release this October. Here are the current list of authors with more being announced closer to publication.Ben Acker & Ben BlackerRenee AhdiehTom AnglebergerMeg CabotRae CarsonAdam ChristopherZoraida CordovaDelilah S. DawsonPaul DiniAlexander FreedJason FryChristie GoldenEK Johnston & Ashley EcksteinPaul KempMur LaffertyKen LiuGriffin McElroyJohn Jackson MillerNnedi OkoraforDaniel José OlderMallory OrtbergMadeleine RouxGary D. SchmidtCavan ScottSabaa TahirGlen WeldonChuck WendigGary WhittaOne of the most beautiful things about this project is that all the authors have written their short stories for charity, as the proceeds from this book will go towards First Book – a non profit organization that provides new books, learning materials and other essentials to educators and organizations serving children in need.“To further celebrate the launch of this book and both companies’ longstanding relationships with First Book, Penguin Random House has donated $100,000 to First Book, and Disney/Lucasfilm has donated 100,000 children’s books — valued at 1 million dollars — to support First Book and their mission of providing educational resources to children in need. Over the past 16 years, Disney has donated more than 57 million books to First Book.”Whether you are a Star Wars novel fan, film buff or just a casual fan looking to help out a great cause, this is definitely worth a purchase. (You can pre-order the book here)This is such a fun a exciting idea that I hope two more are made for the 40th anniversary’s of The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi as well.Need more Star Wars in while waiting, check out our gift guide for amazing things from a galaxy far far away. Mattel Unveils Fashionable ‘Star Wars’ x Barbie Dolls‘Star Wars: Resistance’ Finale Sets Up ‘The Rise of Sk… Stay on targetlast_img read more

Nick Wright Deflategate Scissors accidents The Patriots are headed to the Super

first_img Advertisement So, Brady won’t suit up for the Patriots in the regular season until Week 4. And now, because of Scissorsgate, it remains to be seen if he takes a snap in the preseason.Today in The Herd, Nick Wright sat in for Colin, and confidently proclaimed that it doesn’t matter, the Patriots are headed to the Super Bowl.“Tom Brady’s sliced finger be damned. The four game suspension be damned. There is not a time since Tom Brady has been there that they head into a season with a clearer path to the Super Bowl. Period. Point blank.”Nick pointed supported his proclamation by pointing out that the NFL, much like the NBA, is top heavy, with the NFC comparing to the Western Conference. While the Panthers, Cardinals, Packers, Seahawks will need to endure a death march to make it to the Super Bowl, the Patriots should be at full strength against the flawed elite of the AFC.The Broncos don’t have a quarterback, the Bengals have Andy Dalton and no Hue Jackson, the Steelers defense is a sieve, and the Chiefs are 3 yards and a cloud of playoff elimination.The NFL Playoffs are all about momentum. Even if Brady misses the first four games, by the time the playoffs roll around the Patriots will be on a roll he will have a death stare like Hannibal Lecter at human flesh convention.The Patriots have never had a clearer path to the Super Bowl. #TheHerdhttps://t.co/MFW2A3Co7w— Herd w/Colin Cowherd (@TheHerd) August 19, 2016 Bad things do happen to beautiful people. Everybody, including remote alien species that casually eavesdrop on human civilization, already know about Tom Brady’s four game Deflategate suspension to start the NFL regular season.Then last night, Brady was scratched from a scheduled preseason start against the Chicago Bears after bizarrely slicing his thumb on a pair of scissors. What the hell is going on here? This isn’t Tom Brady’s life, it sounds like Brandon Weeden’s.BREAKING: Brady misses start after slicing thumb with scissors prior to Thursday’s preseason game https://t.co/38inBngO8y— Tom E. Curran (@tomecurran) August 19, 2016last_img read more

VIDEO Personalizing Radiotherapy Using Genomic Markers of Radiosensitivity

first_img Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Sponsored Videos View all 142 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Recent Videos View all 606 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Find more SCCT news and videos Women’s Health View all 62 items Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 6:35Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -6:35 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Technology Reports View all 9 items Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Find more SCCT news and videos Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Videos | Radiation Oncology | November 06, 2018 VIDEO: Personalizing Radiotherapy Using Genomic Markers of Radiosensitivity Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Genomics can be used to assess a patient’s radiosensitivity, which can be used to increase or decrease the radiation that needs to be delivered to treat the tumor and spare surrounding healthy tissue. Javier Torres-Roca, M.D., associate professor of radiation oncology, Moffit Cancer Center, and co-founder of the genomics company Cvergenx, spoke on this topic at the ASTRO 2018 conference. Find more news, videos and late-breating studies from ASTRO 2018. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis.center_img Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology View all 220 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

FILE In this May 3 2017 file photo Danny DeVit

first_img FILE – In this May 3, 2017 file photo, Danny DeVito participates in the 2017 Tony Awards Meet the Nominees press day in New York. The Asbury Park Press reports that the Asbury Park City Council honored Devito on Saturday, April 29, 2018, by declaring his birthday, Nov. 17, as “Danny DeVito Day” in his hometown. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP, File) by The Associated Press Posted Apr 30, 2018 5:07 am PDT Last Updated Apr 30, 2018 at 5:40 am PDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email ASBURY PARK, N.J. – Danny DeVito has gotten his own day in his native New Jersey.The Asbury Park Press reports the Asbury Park City Council honoured the actor Saturday night by declaring his birthday, Nov. 17, as “Danny DeVito Day” in his hometown.The honour was announced as DeVito appeared at the Asbury Park Music and Film Festival.DeVito starred in the classic TV series “Taxi” and films including “Twins” and “Batman Returns.” He starred in the hit comedy “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia.”The 73-year-old was born in Neptune Township and raised in Asbury Park.New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy also spoke at the festival, saying: “Danny has never forgotten where he came from.”center_img Danny DeVito gets his own day in his native New Jerseylast_img read more

UK pensions 2015 – What can you do with your funds

first_imgBy Lou Cunningham, Partner, Blevins FranksThis April sees the introduction of a new pension regime in the UK. What will the changes mean for you?After first being announced in the March budget, further reform was released in stages over 2014. It is important that you are up to date on all the changes and latest legislation. There are different rules for different types of pensions, so it is rather confusing.In order to make an informed decision, you need to be aware of all the implications of all your options, for your long-term financial security, your heirs, and from a UK and Cyprus taxation point of view.Here is a summary of the key changes from April 6, 2015, which apply to those with defined contribution schemes and aged 55 or over:• You will have complete freedom to draw down as much or as little of your pension pot as you wish, with no requirement to buy an annuity.• If you cash in your entire pension you will no longer be charged the 55 per cent unauthorised payment tax charge. UK residents will pay tax at their marginal rate of income tax.• You can take a series of lump sums from your pension funds without having to enter into a drawdown policy. This is referred to as uncrystallised fund pension lump sums (UFPLS).• UK residents can choose how to take their 25 per cent tax-free cash lump sum. They can either take it all in one go, or have a quarter of any withdrawals made paid tax-free.• The 55 per cent pension ‘death tax’ will be abolished. If you die under age 75, the balance of your fund can be paid to your choice of beneficiaries as a lump sum or drawdown, tax free. If you are over 75, beneficiaries pay their marginal rate of tax on the income. If they opt to take it as a lump sum, it will be taxed at 45 per cent, though the government hopes to change this to the marginal rate from 2016. This applies to both drawdown and annuities, but not to final salary pensions.• If you have an existing drawdown plan, you can keep it as it is and retain the current income limits (150 per cent of GAD). This may be of interest if you are still able to contribute more than £10,000 to your fund.• The lifetime allowance of £1.25 million still applies. A new requirement for Qualifying Recognised Overseas Pension Schemes (QROPS) to be tested against the allowance more than just at crystallisation has been introduced.Many of the new pension options apply specifically to defined contribution schemes. From April 2015 those with private sector defined benefit pensions could transfer to a defined contribution scheme, but you could lose valuable benefits.Transfers can only be made with advice from a pension transfer specialist regulated by the UK Financial Conduct Authority. Most Public Sector schemes will not be able to transfer after April 2015.You need to consider the tax implications here in Cyprus to establish what would work best for you. The local tax regime can provide opportunities, if you take specialist advice.Be aware that pension schemes offer sound UK inheritance tax protection, whereas once the cash is back in your estate it could be exposed to inheritance tax. However with expert advice you may be able to avoid or lower your liabilities.This article can only provide a summary of the key points of the new legislation. Sound financial planning and personalised advice is crucial, particularly for those with larger funds. Do not make any decisions until you have all the information and understand all the implications.Tax rates, scope and reliefs may change. Any statements concerning taxation are based upon our understanding of current taxation laws and practices which are subject to change.Tax information has been summarised; an individual is advised to seek personalised advice.Learn more about Blevins FranksYou May LikeLivestlyChip And Joanna’s $18M Mansion Is Perfect, But It’s The Backyard Everyone Is Talking AboutLivestlyUndoPopularEverythingColorado Mom Adopted Two Children, Months Later She Learned Who They Really ArePopularEverythingUndoKelley Blue BookYou Won’t Believe How Affordable These Ford Car Models AreKelley Blue BookUndo Pensioner dies after crash on Paphos-Polis roadUndoCruise passenger airlifted to Paphos hospitalUndoRemand for pair in alleged property fraud (Updated)Undoby Taboolaby Taboolalast_img read more